Posts

Does you baby have lip blisters?

See my latest blog on Lip Blisters (Friction Blisters) and what they might mean!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk5sai7AYPE&t=5s

I just I just wanted to talk a little bit today about lip blisters.

Babies develop their suck swallow reflex or co-ordination from about 20 weeks in utero. Often in utero, they are sucking on their fingers and creating these little lip blisters, or what I call friction blisters.

And when they get out and they start to learn to breastfeed properly, if they do have a shallow latch or they’re compensating, they will be using their lips to suction on like that.

So they’re breastfeeding more like they’re trying to suck on the straw.

When you’re breastfeeding trying to suck on a shallow latch, then you’re going to compensate and use all these muscles around here so those lip blisters or friction blisters will be more pronounced.

The way that you can help your baby is by getting a deeper latch.

Keep watching in Part 2.wanted to talk a little bit today about lip blisters.

Babies develop their suck swallow reflex or co-ordination from about 20 weeks in utero. Often in utero, they are sucking on their fingers and creating these little lip blisters, or what I call friction blisters.

And when they get out and they start to learn to breastfeed properly, if they do have a shallow latch or they’re compensating, they will be using their lips to suction on like that.

So they’re breastfeeding more like they’re trying to suck on the straw.

When you’re breastfeeding trying to suck on a shallow latch, then you’re going to compensate and use all these muscles around here so those lip blisters or friction blisters will be more pronounced.

The way that you can help your baby is by getting a deeper latch.

 

Pumping and Feeding- keeping up to date to serve you!

There are so many pumps, flanges, teats, bottles and feeding tools available for new parents to choose from. Whether you are feeding from your breast/chest/bottle/cup/tube it can be a over whelming process that a IBCLC can help make your journey a smoother one!

Book a consult today to avoid confusion, spending way to much money on products and above all comfort, and confidence in feeding your baby #letmilkflow


 

What are the 3 most common breastfeeding problems?

Many new breastfeeding families are faced with common breastfeeding problems. It is really important to touch base with a IBCLC to ask for help as soon as possible to prevent a bigger issue from occurring.

In IBCLC world we know that as long as the issue has been about is as long as it takes to fix with most common breastfeeding problems.

The most common issues are:

  • Sore or cracked nipples- normally to do with position- breastfeeding is not meant to be painful. So if your toes are curling, your shoulders are up around your ears and your baby is damaging your nipples in a nipple cripple then time to seek help.

 

  • Not enough milk- most mums are worried their baby is not getting enough milk. Knowing how many wet and dirty nappies are day your baby should have can give you early confidence that your milk supply is enough. Hearing your baby swallow, Skin to skin, baby wearing all nurture milk supply.

 

  • Breast engorgement- this is when your breasts are full and swollen and painful. It can occur in the days following birth as your breasts swell with milk. The skin will feel tight and shiny- like your forehead. It can also mean your baby is not latching and draining the milk competently when feeding. If it does not settle down as your supply adjusts to your baby feeding its time to seek health. A swollen breast will make the nipple and areola area flatter- this means your baby may have a shallow latch, leading to smaller milk transfer.

If you would like further support please book a consult through this link: https://app.milknotes.com/calendar?id=1530

 

 

Nipple Shield Sizing- how to get the best fit

Did you know that the wrong pump flange size or nipple shield size can lesson or even decrease the amount of milk you pump or transfer?

It is so important to get the correct fit so that you are comfortable and you maximise each pumping or feeding session.

Most pumps come with a 24mm and 22mm size flange.. which often is simply to large.

As a IBCLC I find the majority of my clients are using the wrong size!

Did you know that a nipple can be a different size?- Yes sometimes you do need diiferent size for each breast.

Did you know you measure your nipple size after a pumping session?

Did you know pressing the flange to hard into your breasts can block a milk duct?

If the flange is to big your areola will be drawn  up inside and pain…. OUCH!

Here is a FREE Nipple Measure Chart from Pumpables

OR to book a flange sizing/pump consult click here

credit pic- medula.

How To Breastfeed and Get a Good Latch Each Time

Love Love Love these FREE videos by Dr Robyn Thompson!